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Summer weather can take a toll on your roof

  • jaredscott's picture
    Started by jaredscott
    (07 Jul '14)

    If you had to guess which season was the hardest on your roof, you'd probably guess winter because of the harsh, wet weather. While it is true that more leaks are discovered during the winter season, most roofing problems such as leaks actually get their start during the summer. The real culprit is fluctuating temperatures. When the hot sun is beating down on a roof, the shingles and flashing expand. But when an afternoon thunderstorm rolls in, the temperatures can drop dramatically. This sudden drop in temperature cause the shingles and flashing to contract.

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on Mon, 2014-07-07 01:00

If you had to guess which season was the hardest on your roof, you'd probably guess winter because of the harsh, wet weather. While it is true that more leaks are discovered during the winter season, most roofing problems such as leaks actually get their start during the summer. The real culprit is fluctuating temperatures. When the hot sun is beating down on a roof, the shingles and flashing expand. But when an afternoon thunderstorm rolls in, the temperatures can drop dramatically. This sudden drop in temperature cause the shingles and flashing to contract. It's the expansion and contraction of roofing materials that lead to roof damage and leaks. With summer in full swing, here's a look at some problems your roof can face and how to take care of them.

Heat

Unless you are somewhat familiar with the roofing industry, you may not realize that a roofing system is more than just the shingles. Ventilation is a huge aspect of a roofing system. If the ventilation of the roof is not done properly, serious problems can occur. An improperly ventilated roof will become much hotter than it should in the summer. As the shingles bake in the summer sun, they become brittle and more prone to damage. If you notice that your shingles are cracking and curling prematurely, in could be a sign that your roof's ventilation is to blame. Fortunately, the ventilation can be fixed to allow hot air from your attic to escape through the roof preventing your roof from overheating.

Hail

Another problem roofs face especially in summer is damage from hail. Often, hail falls during thunderstorms and can cause some serious problems for roof. The hail doesn't have to be golf ball-sized to wreak havoc on your roof. In fact, it's often the marble-sized hail that causes the most problems. While larger hail is sure to leave signs of damage, smaller hail can cause roofing shingles to lose their granules, something that isn't really visible from the ground. Granule loss reduces the integrity of your roof. Worst of all, most homeowners don't realize until it's too late to submit a claim to the insurance company. A good rule of thumb is to get out and carefully inspect your roof or hire a roofing company to come do it after a hail storm even if you can't see any damage.

Strong winds

Finally, your roof can be damaged by strong winds. A straight-line wind burst during a thunderstorm, for instance, can damage shingles or even remove them from the roof completely. But the biggest threat to your roof isn't the wind itself but tree branches and debris that can strike your roof causing extensive damage. Of course there is no way to completely remove this threat, but you can greatly reduce the danger by taking care of any tree branches that hang near your roof. By regularly trimming back the trees closest to your roof you limit the chance of damage to your roof.

Home improvement news brought to you by bartonroof.com

Source: dailycommercial.com/life/article_c7122b13-6338-520e-8d27-6da1f3ab075c.html

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